Kansas City Council extends mask mandate for K-12 schools

The Kansas City, Missouri council voted 10 to 2 on Thursday to extend the city’s mask mandate for K-12 schools. The order extends the mandate until February 17. The current order would have expired on Thursday. The mask order affects all districts in the city limits. The order does not include children under the age of 5 or children with an underlying medical condition or relevant disability. The new mask mandate covers all children, teachers, staff and visitors inside school buildings. The mandate was first approved by the city council on January 6. the warrant currently in Johnson County, Kansas. Rates of COVID-19 cases and hospitalizations are trending down in Kansas City, Missouri. Lucas said he hopes after two more weeks the warrant can be lifted. to be able to step out of mandate or order business entirely,” the mayor said. to choose how they want to live their life. That’s the first thing. The second thing is that the municipal government does not run school boards or school districts. School boards run school districts. They should be making the decisions for their students and their staff and their teachers,” Hall said.

Kansas City, Missouri, council voted 10-2 on Thursday to extend the city’s mask mandate for K-12 schools.

The order extends the mandate until February 17. The current order would have expired on Thursday.

The order of the masks affects all districts within the city limits.

The order does not include children under the age of 5 or children with an underlying medical condition or relevant disability. The new mask mandate covers all children, teachers, staff and visitors inside school buildings.

The mandate was first approved by the city council on January 6.

Mayor Quinton Lucas said he initially wanted to extend it for 30 days, but opted for two weeks to match the mandate currently in Johnson County, Kansas.

Rates of COVID-19 cases and hospitalizations are trending down in Kansas City, Missouri. Lucas said he hoped after two more weeks the warrant could be lifted.

“Hopefully if our trend lines continue where cases are going down and hopefully we get to a point where there are fewer people in hospitals, maybe we can get out of the mandate or order some cases. entirely,” the mayor said. .

Councilwoman Heather Hall, who voted against the order last month and again on Thursday, said the city shouldn’t make the decision for schools.

“People should be free to choose how they want to live their lives. That’s the first thing. The second thing is that the municipal government doesn’t run school boards or school districts. School boards run school districts. They should be making the decisions for their students and their staff and their teachers,” Hall said.

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