Covid-19 Australia: Queensland registers 24 new cases as face masks are brought back

Queensland has registered 24 new cases of Covid-19 as face mask warrants are reintroduced.

Residents should wear the extra layer of protection when visiting all retail businesses, hospitals, senior care facilities, public transport, carpooling, and airports.

“I ask the people of Queensland once again, this is a small price to pay for your freedoms,” Prime Minister Annastacia Palaszczuk said on Friday.

Queensland has registered 24 new cases of Covid-19 as face mask warrants reintroduced

“I ask the people of Queensland once again, this is a small price to pay for your freedoms,” Prime Minister Annastacia Palaszczuk said on Friday.

“We’re doing this to slow the spread of the virus… we know Christmas is the busiest time of year for people shopping and getting ready.

“We don’t want to see a massive escalation [in cases] at Christmas and New Years. ‘

The 24 new cases announced on Saturday are up from the 20 reported on Friday and the 22 reported on Thursday.

The face mask mandate will not apply in places where a vaccine mandate went into effect from 5 a.m. Friday, such as cafes, restaurants, nightclubs, stadiums and theme parks.

Masks will also not be needed outdoors or in workplaces, the prime minister said.

Ms Palaszczuk said the new mandate would likely remain in place until the state reaches 90% of the eligible population with two doses of a Covid vaccine.

“We are looking to achieve 90% of a single dose in Christmas and a double dose in January,” she said.

Ms Palaszczuk said “there will be no lockdown on Christmas”.

Chief health officer John Gerrard said he didn’t think the mask’s mandate would be “too onerous” for people.

“Wearing a mask is not just for protecting yourself, it’s also for protecting others,” he said.

“It works both ways, so it’s a socially desirable thing to wear a mask and I think it’s somewhat antisocial not to wear a mask in crowded environments.”

Masks are required in retail stores, hospitals, elderly care, public transport, carpooling and airports

Masks are required in retail stores, hospitals, elderly care, public transport, carpooling and airports

Police Commissioner Katarina Carroll said police have already dealt with eight calls regarding the vaccine’s mandate since it took effect at the sites.

She also issued a warning to site owners who have said they publicly ignore the warrant.

“It’s disappointing that people have done this, but they’ve given the police some really good information, so they’re definitely going to be visited,” Ms. Carroll said.

The Prime Minister said the dramatic escalation of cases in NSW and the fact that more than 100,000 border passes to enter Queensland had been received from people in interstate hotspots made the reintroduction masks required.

Visitors from NSW, Victoria and ACT were welcomed to Queensland by road and air last Monday, provided they are fully vaccinated, have a valid border pass and have proof of a PCR test negative within 72 hours of arriving in Queensland.

Visitors from NSW, Victoria and ACT were greeted in Queensland by road and air last Monday, but the state is on the lookout for new cases of Covid that travelers will inevitably bring

Visitors from NSW, Victoria and ACT were greeted in Queensland by road and air last Monday, but the state is on the lookout for new cases of Covid that travelers will inevitably bring

Queensland Health has added new contact tracing sites to its website.

These include Virgin flight VA511 from Sydney to the Gold Coast on December 15 between 8am and 9.40am. All passengers, except rows 28-32, are considered casual contacts and are advised to self-quarantine and get tested.

Those in rows 28-32 are considered close contacts.

Passengers seated in rows 23-27 of Qantas flight QF756 from Brisbane to Townsville on Tuesday, December 14 between 3:32 p.m. and 5:19 p.m. are also considered close contacts of a positive case and should self-quarantine even after receiving a PCR test negative.


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